Flying Saucers: A Comedy/Sci-fi Adventure

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THE EATER OF DREAMS – SHORT DRAMA FOR TWO ACTORS

Its story, about a military robot putting itself back together and menacing a post-apocalyptic ghetto, is a familiar one, but Stanley gives it real verve - Hardware has a stylish, artistic edge that most low-budget genre films of the period sorely lacked. Oh yes - and so too is Stanley's second film, Dust Devil. Some quaint special effects and set design are the few memorable things in this oddly tepid debut from a director now known the world over for his flamboyant destruction of civic buildings. In a post-apocalyptic future, wars between nations are settled not by armies and missiles, but by pitting giant robots against each other in gladiatorial matches.

Achilles Gary Graham is the west's finest robot operator - that is, until he has a Tom Cruise-like crisis of confidence when hundreds of spectators are killed during a particularly ferocious battle. Eventually, he's coaxed out of retirement for one more fight with his arch-nemesis, Alexander Joe Koslo. The script and acting's the wrong side of campy a tone Gordon reportedly insisted on , but the Japanese-inspired robots look great and the stop-motion animation is quite adorable.

Actually shot in but shelved for three years hence its inclusion here , Robot Jox was a flop on release, but has garnered a cult following since. An ill-advised sci-fi comedy in which aliens land on Earth at Halloween and are mistaken for trick-or-treaters by the inhabitants of a small town. The special effects and designs, which pay loving homage to 50s B-movies, are the main reason to watch Spaced Invaders. The flailing attempts at humour, meanwhile, are something of an acquired taste. Bryan Cranston! In fact, Dead Space is pretty much a remake of Forbidden World, with yet another monster terrorising the crew of a roving space craft.

Eagle-eyed viewers may also spot the recycled footage from Battle Beyond The Stars. A live-action version of a cult manga and anime, starring Mark Hamill and directed by Society effects maestro Screaming Mad George? About a young man who encounters an experimental suit of biological armour, The Guyver lacks the angst and melodrama of its Japanese source, but retains the protracted monster fights. Arriving in the wake of Total Recall, this cut-price thriller sees Michael Biehn's hero realise that he's actually a brainwashed assassin with only vague recollections of his former life.

It's Philip K Dick by way of Robert Ludlum, and a poorly-cast Patsy Kensit she plays a psychiatrist love interest and some cheesy direction doesn't help the film's cause. Remember those collars in 's The Running Man, which blew convicts' heads off if they tried to escape? That idea makes a return in Wedlock , in which Rutger Haur stars as a diamond thief trying to sneak out of a high-tech prison. Hauer's presence might make you think that Wedlock 's essential viewing, but the film's hobbled by some pedestrian direction from Lewis Teague Alligator, Cujo, The Jewel Of The Nile and some flimsy made-for-TV production values.

Still, Hauer's natural charisma shines through, and the presence of Mimi Rogers, Stephen Tobolowsky and a young Danny Trejo make it worth a watch. Just about, if only for Hauer's typically ice-cool performance. At one point, he does a seal impression. Never mind the plot, look at the cast. Well, maybe at Freejack 's wrap party, where they probably wondered why they'd agreed to star in this disappointing genre effort in the first place. Estevez stars as a racing driver who's snatched at the moment of death by time travellers from the future.

These "Bonejackers", as they're dubbed, steal living bodies from the past and use them as replacement vessels, thus guaranteeing immortality for the world's wealthy elite. An interesting premise is largely frittered away on a generic chase plot, where Estevez is pursued all over the place by a decidedly wooden Jagger.

What Scott and Cronenweth accomplished with the original film, placing a potboiler within a magnificently conceived alternative reality, Villeneuve and Deakins have respected as they prod at its boundaries. Starship Troopers Director: Paul Verhoeven. Telling the story of a cadre of extremely attractive upper-middle-class white teens played by shiny adults Casper Van Dien, Denise Richards, Nina Meyers, Jake Busey and Neil Patrick Harris who get their cherries popped and then ground into hamburger inside the abattoir of interstellar war, Verhoeven cruises through the many tones of bellicose filmmaking: hawkish propaganda, gritty action setpieces and thrilling adventure sequences, all of it accompanied by plenty of gut-churning CGI, giant space bugs and human heads alike exploding without shame or recourse or respect for basic physics and human empathy.


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Planet of the Apes Director: Franklin J. Zira Kim Hunter at the end of the original Planet of the Apes , as misanthropic astronaut George Taylor Charlton Heston sets out into the Forbidden Zone of this topsy-turvy planet—where intelligent, talking apes are the dominant species and humans are dumb beasts—in order to find out what really happened to his species.

Flying Saucer Daffy - Wikipedia

Unless you were living under a rock for the last 50 years, you know exactly what he will find. Unlike all other apes, Zaius knows the history of the painful and complex relationship between apes and humans. He knows that once an intelligent human like Taylor has a chance to restart yet another attempt at civilization for his species, the same ugliness and destruction that comes with his inner nature will certainly plague his descendants. Therefore, he knows that Taylor will find both his past and his future on that beach.

Time-traveling trains and robot cops!

Today, the Planet of the Apes franchise is still going strong. The timeless appeal of these films stems from the fact that they explore high-concept themes, like the inherent viciousness and frailty of human nature, with brutal clarity, told with a refreshing lack of condescension and philosophical hand-holding.

By presenting a fable world where what we now consider to be animals are dominating humankind, they hold a mirror to our ugliness, arrogance and, just maybe, our chance for redemption. Every installment and reiteration of the franchise contains a handful of characters who struggle to go against their basest urges and strive to bring compassion and peace to their kind.

Sci-Fi Films of the ’50s

The one that started it all is still the epitome of the Planet of the Apes experience. Ex Machina Director: Alex Garland. While popular science-fiction films have taught us that, no matter what we do, robots that become self-aware will eventually rise up and kill us, recent advances in artificial intelligence in the real world have confirmed something much seedier about the human imperative: If given the technology to design thinking, feeling robots, we will always try to have sex with them.

Taking cues from obvious predecessors like A Space Odyssey and AI —some will even compare it to Her — Ex Machina stands solidly on its own as a highly stylized and mesmerizing film, never overly dependent on CGI, and instead built upon the ample talents of a small cast. Garland interprets the phrase literally: Here, that machine is a robot named Ava, played by Swedish actress Alicia Vikander, and that nowhere is where her creator, Nathan Oscar Isaac , performs his research and experiments.

Ava is a heavenly mechanical body of sinewy circuitry topped with a lovely face, reminiscent of a Chris Cunningham creation. Her creator is an alcoholic genius and head of a Google-like search engine called Bluebook which has made him impossibly rich. Nathan also intends to use Caleb to conduct something of a Turing test on steroids with Ava to determine if she can truly exhibit human behavior. In fact, Ex Machina seems designed around the performances of its excellent mini-ensemble. Fred Stiller Klaus Lowitch investigates personally after his colleagues begin to disappear, and the people around him insist those now missing never actually existed at all.

Predator Director: John McTiernan. But Predator is one of the films of his heyday that dared to conjure a threat that even the specter of Schwarzenegger might not be able to conquer, a space-traveling alien trophy hunter who assembles a grisly collection of skulls and spinal columns throughout. We want to see this merry band of special forces operatives conquer the faceless chameleon set against them.

Seconds Director: John Frankenheimer. Cab driver Korben Dallas Bruce Willis has his daily routine interrupted when Leeloo an early starring role for Milla Jovovich crashes through his roof.


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Leeloo is, it turns out, is a supreme being, sent to Earth to protect humanity from an ancient force that threatens the planet every 5, years. But she still needs Korben, and at the last minute, he figures out his role. Oddly acting extras populate the backgrounds of tracking shots and garbage trucks filled with weird dust fluff which we eventually learn spreads the spores exist at the fringes of the screen. Kaufman piles on more and more revolting, unnerving imagery until he offers up a final shot so bleak that he might as well be punctuating his film, and his vision of modern life, with a final, inevitable plunge into the mouth of Hell.

Forbidden Planet is a rarity in a decade of low-budget B-movie sci-fi. A ship of American astronauts lands on an alien planet where the inhabitants are trying to safeguard the ruins of a previous civilization. Total Recall Director: Paul Verhoeven. Very loosely based on the Philip K. It all works. Verhoeven, in fact, uses Arnold as much as he uses anything else in the budget to tell this darkly exuberant story, from the contorted confusion of the set-up right on through to the eye-popping finale.

The Man from Planet X

It results in a sci-fi screed written in the form of a hundred Ahh-nuld faces, absurd and unforgettable. For as many times as Dick has been adapted, this is perhaps the one time the go-for-broke energy and imagination of his work has made it into the cinema Blade Runner is something else entirely.

Total Recall may have little in common with the actual content of the story it blows up, but it knows the vibe. And PKD vibes are the best kind.


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Where does a movie like Fantastic Planet come from? How does it even get made? Laloux has offered few answers over the years, though the documentary Laloux Sauvage holds some insight into how his mind works. Who is The Thing, and more contentiously, when and how did they become The Thing?

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